Cut Gate is probably the best trail in the Peak District, download our easy-to-follow route and discover why. Rocks, singletrack and epic views accessed through mbr’s GPS download.

As featured in MBR’s 20 best mountain bike UK trails, click here to view

Cut Gate trail in the Peak District: this is the definitive way to do it.

Cut Gate typically poses a real conundrum to a lot of mountain bikers. It’s hard to decide how to fit it into a loop, so it often gets left out and riders head over to the other Peak classics like Jacob’s Ladder or The Beast, both of which are much easier to work into a loop.

This is a good thing. The lack of traffic on Cut Gate — both from wheels and from walkers — has meant that the trails have retained their narrowness and shape.

There is a wider section in the middle of this iconic moorland trail but it’s not wide and dull. It’s wide and wild. Littered with gritstone rocks of all sizes from pebbledash through to suitcase boulders, it’s all about lightning-fast decision-making and commitment. And luck.

There are riders who will tell you that south-to-north is the way to do Cut Gate. There are just as many other riders who will protest that north-to-south is best. They are both wrong… and right. It’s great in either direction.

The southern-end descent has the majestic zigzag combo of Cranberry Clough, not to mention the eye-watering, bum-puckering speed-trap section just after the slab paving. The northern end has the “pedal-pedal-wheeee-pedal-pedal” ripper-dipper proper singletrack of Mickleden Edge.

The route detailed here involves both of these sections, and the scattershot techno middle section, too.

Yes, it involves doing a lot of the same bits in both directions, but it’s worth it. It works. Any other way of doing Cut Gate involves loads of road/cinderpath slogging and removes one or more glories of this exceptional trail.