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Thread: The MBR Big Question

  1. #21
    Senior Member Fartblood's Avatar
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    Re: The MBR Big Question

    Who cares who he is, just so long as I get my vouchers!
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  2. #22
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    Re: The MBR Big Question

    Is this another one of those wow look at our new portable shower, it's so good it's made me bankrupt (plumbing in required) hooray for nokia users you're all ace and I want to give you free money type wastes of my valuable time?! If so, and I suspect so as this is your first post, feck off and keep your 'vouchers'. If not, maybe an introduction prior to 'wow look what I can give you for free!' type posting.
    I was almost as cynical. My assumption was that he was a journalist with a commission to write on the topic. He needed to canvas a wide range of views as fast as possible from people that know what they are talking about.

    As Greeneye later revealed, I was almost right! As another poster commented, a brief introduction would have helped.
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  3. #23
    Senior Member B1Gdave's Avatar
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    Re: The MBR Big Question

    Feck it, I stick by my guns, and I'll have them vouchers off you an'all MrB, thanks
    When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race.

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  4. #24

    Re: The MBR Big Question

    I was almost as cynical. My assumption was that he was a journalist with a commission to write on the topic. He needed to canvas a wide range of views as fast as possible from people that know what they are talking about.

    I'm not really bothered either way. It's an interesting question worth discussing. Although I think there are really two separate issues addressed by this question, which I tried to discuss in my reply - that of the use of footpaths etc., and that of building illegal trails.

    I don't think that opening up access to footpaths makes it any easier to build berms/jumps as someone suggested. I've never come across berms or jumps (other than the natural kind) on any of the bridleways I've ridden.

    I understand all too well as a biologist that the smallest of changes can have far reaching consequences. Even the most barren looking place could be the last refuge of the lesser crested bull laughing frog, which could be the last food supply for the greater crested ninja squirrel.....

    Having said all this, I am guilty of riding and even building illegal trails in the past, although I never cut a new trail, just built stuff on existing illegal trails/paths. I think that if it is done sensibly and disruption to vegetation is avoided then it should be pretty harmless. There is always going to be a question of disruption to the environment on any trail, legal or illegal, but in my opinion the goal is to enable people to enjoy and use the countryside, whether that be for walking or cycling, or whatever, without destroying it. I think that the best way to do this is to open up accessibility and create more sanctioned trails (which can be done with proper environmental assessment), reducing the temptation to build new ones. If people don't have any trails in their area then there will always be someone who builds some.

  5. #25
    Senior Member fredmundo's Avatar
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    Re: The MBR Big Question

    I have a pretty similar opinion to yourself the Qtip, I will post a proper response at some point. I'm not sure when I'll have the time to sit and think to create a considered and concise response as I fear that once I start typing I'm going to hit the post word count limit quite easily.

    One thing I have to take up with you though is that it's a myth that the greater crested ninja squirrel feeds on the lesser crested bull laughing frog. There was a recent article published in nature that contradicts the article published in the new scientist (which I suspect you must have read). It states that there is something in the frog that actually causes great illness in the squirrel if they do eat this frog, it further found that the main diet consisted of lesser maned bovine smirking toad, which at a quick glance can easily be mistaken for the phenotypically similar frog. It also supposed that the adverse reaction combined with a recent increase in the number of the frogs found in the squirrel habitat was a large factor in the recent decline in ninja squirrel numbers.

    Sad but unless we act now, it could become an even rarer sight on the british countryside.
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  6. #26

    Re: The MBR Big Question

    Thanks for pointing out my oversight Fredmundo, I had not read that particular article. Their findings do indeed seem to be accurate, although one has to forgive the authors of the New Scientist article for mistaking the lesser crested bull laughing frog for the lesser maned bovine smirking toad. It is a particularly beautiful example of evolution in action though, with the toad evolving towards the phenotype of the more common frog, thus causing their main predator, the greater crested ninja squirrel, to mistake the frogs for toads. Not only has this reduced the numbers of their main predators, it has given the smirking toads another great advantage in that there is now less competition for the main food source shared by the frog and toad species, the ring-legged howling beetle.

    However, I feel that the authors of the Nature article have made a rather great oversight in their predictions. The surge in numbers of the bovine smirking toads will soon mean that the chances of the squirrels coming across the laughing frogs instead of smirking toads will be dramatically reduced, allowing the squirrel population to re-establish itself and the levels of the frog and toad populations will reach an equilibrium of approximately equal numbers. However, the increase in smirking toad numbers will dramatically reduce the population of the ring-legged howling beetle, the sole food source of the smirking toad. The laughing frogs on the other hand are able to utilise the spotted honey woodlouse as an alternative food source, since they can neutralise the poisons contained within the toxic woodlice. Thus, once again the toad populations will drop, the beetle populations will increase, the squirrels will start eating more of the frogs due to the toads being less common, and the whole cycle will start again.

    The laughing frogs clearly play a vital role in this intricate cycle and destruction of their habitat would lead to populations of ninja squirrels increasing exponentially, and I'm sure I don't need to tell you about the catastrophic consequences that would have for thin-nosed blue squirrels, flat-footed plodding badgers, and flying tree moles.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Fartblood's Avatar
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    Re: The MBR Big Question

    In the immortal words of Derek and Clive...

    "You see, when I hear of an endangered species I think 'f**k em' "
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  8. #28
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    Re: The MBR Big Question

    Thanks for pointing out my oversight Fredmundo, I had not read that particular article. Their findings do indeed seem to be accurate, although one has to forgive the authors of the New Scientist article for mistaking the lesser crested bull laughing frog for the lesser maned bovine smirking toad. It is a particularly beautiful example of evolution in action though, with the toad evolving towards the phenotype of the more common frog, thus causing their main predator, the greater crested ninja squirrel, to mistake the frogs for toads. Not only has this reduced the numbers of their main predators, it has given the smirking toads another great advantage in that there is now less competition for the main food source shared by the frog and toad species, the ring-legged howling beetle.

    However, I feel that the authors of the Nature article have made a rather great oversight in their predictions. The surge in numbers of the bovine smirking toads will soon mean that the chances of the squirrels coming across the laughing frogs instead of smirking toads will be dramatically reduced, allowing the squirrel population to re-establish itself and the levels of the frog and toad populations will reach an equilibrium of approximately equal numbers. However, the increase in smirking toad numbers will dramatically reduce the population of the ring-legged howling beetle, the sole food source of the smirking toad. The laughing frogs on the other hand are able to utilise the spotted honey woodlouse as an alternative food source, since they can neutralise the poisons contained within the toxic woodlice. Thus, once again the toad populations will drop, the beetle populations will increase, the squirrels will start eating more of the frogs due to the toads being less common, and the whole cycle will start again.

    The laughing frogs clearly play a vital role in this intricate cycle and destruction of their habitat would lead to populations of ninja squirrels increasing exponentially, and I'm sure I don't need to tell you about the catastrophic consequences that would have for thin-nosed blue squirrels, flat-footed plodding badgers, and flying tree moles.
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  9. #29
    Senior Member fredmundo's Avatar
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    Re: The MBR Big Question

    It is so easy to over look the little things that maintain the balance. You really often have to marvel at the awesomeness of the evolutionary arms trace that is mother nature.


    speaking of nature, I was in wharncliffe the other day and saw a snake taking a swim. It was ace, I didn't think that we got them this far north.
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  10. #30
    Senior Member greeneye's Avatar
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    Re: The MBR Big Question

    when does a trail become a trail??

    is there a limit to how long it needs to be before its a trail? does it need to have certain criteria to be a trail? if so then what?

    when i was a kid i would think nothing of building a few jumps in the forest and playing there all day, is that a trail and is it illegal??

    what im getting at is if a bunch of lads want to knock up a few jumps then add a berm or 2 and later a drop off or 2 etc etc then why is that bad?
    if a passing mtbiker happens to stumble on the "trail" and spends an hour or 2 having FUN then why is that bad?

    is it all down to health and safety?? is it the odd inividual who has a stumble and then feels the need to claim for his/her own stupidity?

    what if your nearest legal trail centre is 50 miles away but you know of some awesome not so legal trails on your door step, would you not think its a good thing then.

    i say build the trails and let us decide wether we want to ride them.
    Yes but, regardless of what they build, if the chosen piece of land is some ancient monument or site of scientific interest then they are in serious trouble.

    Look at it this way, would you be happy to pull back the curtain one morning to find the local kids have been into your garden over night and turned it into a mini jump park, after all your garden is private property (ok bad analogy but you get the point).
    i do get your point xendy.

    i was answereing the question from a different angle, i was thinking of the actual trails and reasons for and against them rather than the location's.

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