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Thread: Emergency chain repair

  1. #1
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    Emergency chain repair

    Hi chaps,

    Today I was out on the trail when my chain snapped!! Luckily I had a friend with me that had fixed chains trailside before.
    As great as it was for him to fix the chain (and he did a great job of it) he took out enough links out that I can no longer access the largest gear on the rear cassette.
    Is it possible to buy individual links? Or does it mean a whole new chain?

    I have a ride planned for monday and could really use having all of my 20 gears working.

    Any advice?

  2. #2
    Super Moderator xendistar's Avatar
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    Yes buy a new chain, even if you could buy a link it will not be comparable to those worn links in your existing chain and will cause more problems
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  3. #3
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    I am hoping that I can replace the two links to be honest. Seems a shame to waste the chain as the bike is only 9 months old.
    I could place the links at different sections?

  4. #4
    Senior Member fredmundo's Avatar
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    Yup, what xendi says...

    When you are getting your chain, pick up a couple of spare split links (aka power links). They will be a much better fix next time it happens... You knock out the outer link then use that instead. Permanent trail side fix.
    "Duct tape is like the force: It has a dark side and a light side and it holds the universe together."- Carl Zwanzig

  5. #5
    Senior Member NorthernMatt's Avatar
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    If you change the chain it may depend on how many miles you've done in the last 9 months. You may fit a new chain and find that it skips on your existing cassette. If that happens then you're either stuck with your current chain which won't go onto the lowest gear or you have to buy a new cassette to match the new chain.

    If you fit only two new links then depending on the wear on your current setup you may get away with it or you may end up with two links that jump across the cassette every time they run over it. There's only one way to find out and that is to buy a new chain, and be well prepared to fork out for a new cassette if needed.

  6. #6
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    If the chain has been stressed enough to snap, where else has it been stressed? It may be just waiting to fail all over again. Get rid of it!

    PS: And nine months of riding can be a lot on a mountain bike, depending upon where you've been. Check the chain stretch with a wear guage. Check it in several places.
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  7. #7
    Super Moderator xendistar's Avatar
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    Pick up a chain wear gauge when you pick up your new chain, there a good chance your chain is beyond the .75% mark

    Watch this video

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-iTruN8F3A
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  8. #8
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    If you change the chain, change the cassette as well- far better in the long run. It's. Worth carrying a couple of SRAM power links in the back pack - walking isn't fun
    'Lets go down there, what's the worst that can happen?'

  9. #9
    Senior Member MTBLeague's Avatar
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    I can see a chain being worn in 9 months easly, but not the cassete, let's see if it starts jumping after a new chain, you can go through 3+ chains before the wear in the either the chainrings or cassete causes problems.

  10. #10
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    Seriuosly good advice which is appreciated.

    I think I will head down the road of replacing the chain and keeping my fingers crossed that I dont need to change the cassette.

    Does anyone think it is possible to adjust the tensions of the gears to allow the chain to work fully at the smaller length??
    (I suppose chains have that particular number of links for a reason....right??)

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